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Guidebook Supplement  - Flora & Fauna

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Flora & Fauna


These are most certainly not all the species within Novus, but rather just a small list of some of the more prevelant ones within each area. Be creative - use the biome descriptions to look up other interesting species you could interact with! This page goes hand-in-hand with the Guidebook section.


LEGEND

-- Mythicals that are considered closed species, copyright to Inkbone. If you wish to use them as a bonded or outside of Novus, you must contact her.

-- Species that are poisonous, venomous, or toxic in some fashion.

-- Species that have edible fruits, nuts, or seeds.

-- Species that have some medicinal benefit.










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Delumine




Illuster Meadow - Biome type: Short-grass prairie.


  • None.



  •              Eulalia Grass (miscanthus sinensis): A herbaceous perennial bunchgrass with dense clumps of tall blades that form purplish, feathered panicles near the end. This grass can grow to be 3 to 7 feet tall on average – possibly even as tall as 13 feet.

    ✪ ☠ ✚ ❦ Feathergrass (stipa tenuissima)
    A herbaceous perennial bunchgrass with dense clumps of medium length blades that form yellowish, feathered panicles near the end. This grass can grow to be 24 inches tall.

    Lady's Hourglass Pitcher (Sarracenia arborescens): This mythical species is classified as a large shrub, and is a grand and hardy carnivorous plant with a tall, thick stalk (3-5 feet in height). Large fan-like leaves sprout along the stem. Flowers bloom at the very top and bottom only, and are a bulbous type of pitcher plant that features two connected pitchers, one right on top of the other to form an hour-glass like shape with an operculum on top. The first secretes a nectar along the rim to lure in prey, while the inside walls are slick with a lubricant-like secretion. It collects water and whatever may land in it, but for any prey that is too large to float on top, there is a ‘secondary’ set of jaws that act very much like a venus flytrap, grabbing prey and then receding into the second pitcher. The second pitcher is fed solely by the first, and has no opening of its own. It filters the water down into the stem, and has a very viscous and extremely acidic digestive enzyme in it to dissolve anything else in the water. The first pitcher has no digestive enzymes and is perfectly safe to drink from… so long as you don’t stick your tongue too far down!

    Purple Moor-Grass (molinea caerulea): A herbaceous perennial bunchgrass with coarse, thin blades that develop purple panicles near the end. This grass can grow to be 35 inches tall.



  • Bee Balm (monarda fistulosa): A herbaceous perennial wildflower that occurs in large clumps with lance-shaped toothed leaves and lavender flowers. This wildflower can grow to be 3 feet tall. It has potential medicinal uses, including for cold treatments, poultices for minor wounds and infections, and as an antiseptic.

     Blue Vervain (verbena hastata): A herbaceous perennial wildflower that has small to medium leaves, square stems, and small purple flowers on petite racemes. This wildflower can grow to be 4 feet tall. It has potential medicinal uses, including for nerve damage repair and to relieve stress/tension.

    Butterfly Milkweed (asclepias tuberosa): A perennial flowering plant with long thin leaves, with clustered orange or yellow flowers that attract various insect and birdlife. This plant can grow to be 3 feet tall.

      Culver's Root (veronicastrum virginicum): A herbaceous perennial wildflower that has serrated leaves arranged in whorls, with densely clustered white flowers on long racemes. This wildflower can grow to be 5 feet tall. It has a slight potential medicinal use for curing liver disorders, but requires very special preparation. If not prepared exactly, it is far more toxic and dangerous than helpful. 

    Red Poppy (papaver rhoeas): A herbaceous annual wildflower with thin, weed-like leaves and vivid red flowers. This wildflower can grow to be 27 inches tall, and are the most distinctive species within Illuster.



  • Black-Tailed Prairie Dog (cynomys ludovicianus): A medium sized rodent that has tan fur, lighter colored bellies, and black tipped-tails. They can weigh as much as 3 pounds and be 16 inches long. They dig massive burrow systems referred to as “prairie dog towns,” and can have hundreds of members in their colonies. They are intelligent, and their sophisticated alert system is a good indicator if a predator is nearby.

    Burrowing Owl (athene cunicularia): A small owl species that has evolved to sprint as well as fly, with small beaks, large yellow eyes, and brown and white barred feathers. This bird can grow to be 11 inches long, weigh up to 8.5 ounces, and have a wingspan of 24 inches. Despite their name, they do not create the burrows they inhabit – but rather use abandoned Prairie Dog dens.

    Giant Anteater (myrmecophaga tridactyla): A large insectivorous mammal with a distinctly elongated snout, large bushy tail, and fur that ranges from black to gray to white. They can grow to be 85 pounds and 7 feet long.

    Imperial Hound (Canis geoindigator): A distant relative of the coyote, this large mythical species is found exclusively on the land of Novus. They can grow to be 5 feet long, 3.5 feet high, and weigh up to 180 pounds. Their bodies are larger than their relatives, but short and heavily muscled in stature, keeping them low to the ground while maintaining their power. Their snouts are longer and nose bridges more convex than their relatives, but their most notable evolution are their front paws. Wide with hearty joints and long, thick claws like a mole suitable for digging, each digit is connected by a membrane to make them more efficient. Their back paws feature smaller, but sharper claws, with a noticeably enlarged dewclaw, meant for clinging to prey. Overall their coats are more slick and short than any standard coyote, with their tail being far thinner and shorter. Still a highly carnivorous predator, they feast on all in the land – from the prairie dogs who they are easily equipped to dig out of their burrows, to the large ungulate prey who they can ambush in quick bursts. They are highly intelligent creatures, raising pups in matriarchal packs of 3 – 4 members. 

    Wood Bison (bison bison athabascae): A massive, shoulder-heavy ungulate species, with heavy, coarse fur on their front half and very thin fur on their haunches. They travel in small herds, passing between the meadow and the woods and can weigh up to 2,000 pounds. While not naturally aggressive, they can be if provoked or threatened.



  • Massasauga Rattlesnake (sistrurus catenatus): A venomous rattlesnake/pit viper with distinctive coloration: gray base with solid black splotches along the spine, and three rows of smaller, alternating black spots along the sides. It is generally not aggressive unless cornered or stepped on, but its venom is potentially deadly, as it is severely cytotoxic (destroys tissue) and prevents blood clotting.



  • None.







Rapax River - Biome type: Freshwater swift river. Brackish water near the Terminus sea sides.


  • None.



  • Water Willow (Justicia americana): A herbaceous, aquatic flowering plant found within the shaols and riffles of the Rapax River. The stems grow underwater from a creeping rhizome, with small linear leaves and pale-colored flowers



  • None.



  • Pink River Dolphin (inia geoffrensis): A very unique and highly intelligent aquatic mammal, distinguished by its unique long snout and angular back, with their skin color ranging from gray to mottled pink. They can grow to be 7.5 feet long and weigh up to 410 pounds. Despite their size, they do not pose a significant risk to wading equines - instead, they are noted as being very friendly and interactive.

    River Otter (lontra canadensis): A semiaquatic burrowing mammal with a long streamlined body, thick tail, webbed feet, and tiny ears almost flush to their head. They are opportunistic feeders, and will prey upon whatever is most readily available - whether it be small vertebrates, fish, or crustaceans. This mammal can grow to be 42 inches long and weigh up to 25 pounds. 

    Double-Crested Cormorant (phalacrocorax auritus): An iconic semi-aquatic bird with black body feathers, orange skin around their hooked bills, a stocky body with long neck, webbed feet, and fan-like tail. They are a species of bird that is best known for diving into the water to spear fish. Their feathers do not have an oily layer that keeps them dry - which would make it hard for them to dive and swim underwater - so after each time, they must dry out their feathers. They will often be spotted sitting on banks or logs with their wings spread out. This bird can grow to be 35 inches long, weigh up to 5.5 pounds, and have a wingspan of 48 inches.



  • Coastal Giant Salamander (Dicamptodon tenebrosus): One of the largest species of salamander, this amphibian is unique in more than one way. Once larva transition to become adults, they are able to become either semi-aquatic (like a standard salamander), or stay fully aquatic (referred to as a "Neotenic adult" or "Neotenes") and retain their gills. Their coloration ranges from a reddish-tan to a dark reddish-brown, with a dark reticulate pattern. Neotenes will lack the reticulation and be a fully reddish-brown color. Large adults can grow to be 13 inches long and weigh up to 114 g/.25 pounds.

    Western Pond Turtle (Actinemys marmorata): A medium sized turtle with a long tail, dark brown or dull olive shell, and a yellow-ish underbelly with dark splotches. Males have a pale yellow throat. They can grow to be 10 inches long. 

    Tailed Frog (Ascaphus truei): A small-sized aquatic frog found in the fast-flowing sections of Rapax. Adults are roughly 1-2 inches long, with tadpoles being less than an inch in length.

    Green Snaketail Dragonfly (Ophiogomphus cecilia): A vibrantly green, insectivorious dragonfly with black patterning and translucent wings. They can grow to be three inches long.

    Dobsonfly (Corydalus cornutus): A large, insectivorious flying insect with long mandibles, tan body, golden semi-translucent wings, and long antennae. Their larvae are aquatic creatures called hellgrammites, and are a top invertebrate predatory of the stream. The larvae can be 2.5 inches long, and the adults can be 5.5 inches long with a wingspan of 5 inches. 



  • Goliath Tigerfish (hydrocynus goliath): A highly predatory fish that is easily recognizable by its massive, sharp teeth. This fish can grow to be 5 feet long and weigh over 110 pounds. While it normally feeds on smaller fish, it can pose a threat to equines that wade within the waters. It is highly territorial and a bite from this immense fish can inflict serious damage.

    Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis): A freshwater trout with a distinctive red underbelly and cloacal fins, dark brown or olive green body, and yellow and red speckles. At their largest, they can grow to be 35 inches long and weigh up to 15 pounds. Average sizes are up to 25 inches long and 6.5 pounds.

    Arctic Grayling (Thymallus articus): A freshwater fish with a silver-gray body, black flecking, and fins that have a distinctive red, pink, or yellow tinge. They are most easily recognized by their uniquely shaped dorsal fin tha thas distinctive red spots.

    Paddlefish (Polyodon spathula): A large freshwater fish with a shark-like body with a unique paddle-shaped rostrum that inhabits the slow-moving areas and basins of Rapax. They can grow to be 5 feet long and weigh up to 75-100 pounds.

    Butterfly Peacock Bass (Chichla ocellaris): A large freshwater chichlid with a vivid yellow body, red eyes, reddish lower fins, blueish upper fins, and dark brown to black banding. Their tail fin is half blue and half red with a singular eye-spot near the top. They can grow to be 30 inches long and weigh up to 20 pounds.

    Warmouth (Lepomis gulosus): A medium sized freshwater sunfish with a reddish-brown body, darker banding, golden belly, and red eyes with similarly colored streaks running across the cheek scales. They can grow to be 10 inches long and weigh up to 2.25 pounds.

    Additionally, various species of freshwater fish (ranging from 4 to 10 inches).







Viride Forest - Biome type: Temperate deciduous forest.


  •  Beech (fagus grandifolia): A deciduous tree with smooth silver-gray bark, dark green leaves, and fruit in the form of husked edible nuts. This tree can grow to 65 to 115 feet tall.

    Largeleaf Linden (tilia platyphyllos): A deciduous tree with furrowed/fissured dark gray bark, branches that spread upwards at wide angles, large leaves that are dark green with white downy hair on the underside, and fragrant off-white flowers. This tree can grow to be 130 feet tall.

     Shagbark Hickory (carya ovata): A deciduous tree with rough dark-gray bark when mature (smooth when young), green pinnate leaves, catkin flower clusters, and sweet green-husked edible hickory nuts. This tree can grow to be 100 to 150 feet tall.

    Shagbark Sentinel (Carya ovata custos): This mythical ent looks strikingly similar to a standard Shagbark Hickory tree, with one key feature: at their base, frequently hidden by vegetation and shrubbery (often intentionally), is a large tree hollow in its trunk. The cavity in this hollow is deep - seemingly receding even down past the soil level, as if it retreats down to become one with the roots. Tales say that if a visitor brings a token of their gratitude (hint, shiny or exotic stuff) and places it within the Sentinel’s hollow, a golden yellow hickory nut will drop at their feet. Should the bearer stick around, they may be blessed with seeing the Sentinel uproot itself - come to life, some could say - and spend some time gathering hard to find herbs with the guardian of the forest. Should the bearer not stick around, but instead return another day... the Sentinel may place herb bunches in lieu of where the golden hickory used to be. But we’re sure that is all just a superstitious fable... right?



  • Evergreen Blackberry (rubus laciniatus): A large bramble-forming shrub with prickly shoots, green five-leaflet leaves, edible blackberry fruits, and pink or white flowers. This shrub can grow to be 10 feet tall. It should be noted that the brambles pose a significant entrapment risk to equines with long fur, manes, or tails.

    Lady Fern (athyrium filix-femina): A medium fern with light yellow-green fronds arising from a central point and sori located on the underside of the fronds. The fronds themselves can grow to be 35 inches long. It should be noted that unfurled fronds and roots are poisonous.



  • Bloodroot (sanguinaria canadensis): A small herbaceous, perennial flowering plant with a bright white flower with a vivid yellow center and one large green basal leaf. When the flower is in bloom, the basal leaf folds around the stem. When the flower is not in bloom, the basal leaf will stay open and flat. The plant itself can grow to be 8 to 19 inches tall, with the basal leaf growing up to 4.5 inches across. It should be noted that Bloodroot sap is toxic and escharotic (tissue destroying), and can cause severe illness and loss of consciousness/death if ingested.
     
    Woodland Bluebell (hyacinthoides non-scripta): A small, perennial flowering plant growing from a bulb, with up to six linear leaves that bear downward-drooping, vivid violet-blue flowers at the tips. This plant can grow to be 20 inches tall.



  • Bald Eagle (haliaeetus leucocephalus): A large bird of prey with a very distinct appearance: adults sport a brown body, white head and tail, and yellow beak and feet. They can grow to be 40 inches long, weigh 14 pounds, and have a wingspan of up to 7.5 feet.

    Bramblebear (Ursinae baceolus): This fearsome giant creature is a distant, mythical relative of the bear genus Ursidae. Bramblebears are larger than any other bear species, and can grow to be 11 feet long, 7 feet tall, and weigh up to 1000 pounds. They are the true apex predator of the woods, and will tower above most other mammal life! Physically, they appear to be a missing link somewhere between Ursidae and Felidae. The Bramblebear’s muzzle is slightly more elongated than a typical bear specie’s would be, with their lower jaw additionally being much stronger. With said strong jaw, they also have a significantly pronounced underbite and their noses tend to be quite squashed to their snout. Eyes are small, set far down their head, and close together. Ears are small but pointed, and set close to their head. They possess a similar imposing stature to most bear species (stout but thick torso and a naturally hunched back), although their limbs are marginally longer but just as, if not more, muscled. Their fur is shaggy, dense, and littered with spots that help them camouflage and blend in among the trees. Their paws match closely with most other bear species. And while they may be larger than most other species that occupy the woods, their intelligence suffers incredibly. They are often not able to outsmart their prey, and survive as mostly ambush or short-burst predators.

    Honey Badger (mellivora capensis): A primarily carnivorous aggressive mammal with black fur, flat head, short muzzle, a long body that is distinctively thick-set and broad across their white back, short and sturdy legs, and very strong claws. They can grow to be up to 11 inches tall at shoulder, 30 inches long, and 35 pounds. It should be noted that they are extremely territorial, and will attack equines should they traverse too close.

    Tasmanian Devil (sacrophilus harrisii): A carnivorous, solitary, den-dwelling marsupial with black fur and white chest markings, large heads, squat and thick build, long tail, and very strong jaws. They can grow to be up to 25+ inches long and 20 pounds. It should be noted that they are extremely territorial, and will attempt to attack equines should they traverse too close. Additionally, they can run up to 8 MPH in short bursts, and climb moderately sized trees and shrubs.

    Wild Boar (sus scrofa): A large swine that has coarse fur, short legs, and small tusks. They are herbivore scavengers, adept at using their snouts to dig around for vegetation. They can grow to be 60 inches long, 30 inches tall, and up to 225 pounds. While they are herbivores, they are significantly aggressive – especially when piglets are present. An adult boar can easily cause substantial injury to an adult equine.



  • Aspic Viper (vipera aspis): A venomous viper with a tan body, brown segmented line markings, and a distinctly cream-colored underbelly. They can grow to be 30 inches long. Their venom is potent, but does not often produce neurotoxic symptoms. Instead, victims will experience immediate and sharp pain at the bite site, edema, vision impairment, and eventually haemorrhagic necrosis. The venom may cause renal failure or neurotoxic symptoms in particularly severe cases.

    Timber Rattlesnake (crotalus horridus): A venomous rattlesnake/pit viper with a distinctive, but easily camouflaged, color: their base color is a tan, with a distinct rustic orange stripe down their spine and brown-black bands. They can grow to be 60 inches long and up to 3 pounds. Their venom is neurotoxic, causing rapid muscle necrosis, paralysis, and severe blood clotting/coagulation.



  • None.









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Solterra




Mors Desert - Biome type: Arid desert with very little flora or fauna.


  • Senita (pachycereus schottii): A columnar, cluster-forming cactus with olive green flesh and thousands of pale, 4 inch long bristle-like spines near the stem tips, pale pink nocturnal flowers, and bright red edible fruit. The sheer amount of spines on this cactus give it the appearance of being "fuzzy." This cactus can grow to be 15 feet tall and 10 feet wide at the base of the cluster.



  • Green Ephedra (ephedra viridis): A woody, medium sized shrub with green to yellow twig clusters. It has some herbal qualities, with it working best as a decongestant. It also has some use to relieve headaches, lower fevers, and to alleviate bowel and stomach disorders. In higher doses, it acts as a stimulant and can dangerously increase heart rates - so be careful. 

    Ocotillo (fouquieria splendens): A tall plant with spiny stems, small vibrant ovate leaves, and bright crimson flowers clustered at the tip of mature stems. Ocotillo appears to be a cacti, but it is not. This plant can grow to be 33 feet tall.



  • None.



  • Dorcas Gazelle (gazella dorcas): A small gazelle with longer than normal ears, strongly curved horns, and pale fawn-colored fur. They form large herds and can grow to be 1 foot tall at the shoulder, and weigh up to 45 pounds. 

    Turkey Vulture (cathartes aura): A carnivorous scavenging bird with dark brown to tan feathers, and a bright red, featherless head. They can grow to be 32 inches long, weigh up to 5 pounds, and have a wingspan of up to 72 inches. They have a habit of stalking inhabitants crossing the Mors Desert, in hopes of an easy meal. They will feast upon dying but still living animals that collapse in the desert, effectively eating them alive.



  • Deathstalker Scorpion (leiurus quinquestriatus): A small venomous scorpion with a distinctive yellow coloration. They are only 1 to 3 inches long, but incredibly venomous for their size. The venom is a mixture of several types of neurotoxins, and is particularly dangerous to foals and the elderly or sick. Rapid muscle necrosis, paralysis, and blood clotting/coagulation occur at the site of the sting.

    Desert Tortoise (gopherus agassizii): A medium sized tortoise that spends most of its time in the underground burrows it digs, keeping cool. They grow to be 14 inches long and their shells are a dull brown and tan combination. They can live to be 80 years old.

    Sand Viper (cerastes vipera): A venomous species of viper with speckled tan and brown scales, which make for excellent camouflage in the sands in which they often partially bury themselves. They can grow to be 50 inches long. Their venom is not particularly potent, and generally only fatal to foals and the elderly. In non-fatal common cases, it will cause vomiting, diarrhea, and muscle cramping.

    Sandwyrm (Draco harenae): The most massive of all the mythicals within Novus, and probably the most fearsome. As adults, these creatures can grow to unrivaled sizes of 20 plus feet long, weigh up to 2,000 pounds, and live for 80 to 100 years. Juveniles average roughly 5 to 10 feet long, but even though they are smaller, they are no less of a threat. Their legless, serpent/lindwurm-like body features smooth scales and a heavily ridged flat-top spine. Their eyes are small, set deep into their skulls, lidded, and have poor vision. A tapered, thin-nosed snout allows them to easily bury themselves into the sand, although their jaws are littered with large, serrated, backwards-facing teeth. In fact, their jaws built like many snakes - with front portion of their lower jaws only connected by a highly flexible tendon. This evolutionary feature gives them the ability to 'split' and expand their jaws to swallow prey bigger than their own head. To assist in this, their throat is deeper than the rest of their body, and features a specialized, expandable pouch. Lining their head, from their temples down to their lower jaw, are several rough-textured spines connected by a durable membrane. These bony protrusions have the ability to flare out, much like a frilled lizard, or fold down to lay flat against their neck while navigating the sands. When underneath the desert, they use an undulating motion to move quickly and effortlessly - meaning that they can outrun (or is it outswim?) most prey species. Hunting prey by infrared sensing, Sandwyrms are highly territorial, hypercarnivorous, and truly the last ones that you want to stumble upon while traversing the desert. And should you have the misfortune of doing so, your only real hope is to keep incredibly still..



  • None.







Vitae Oasis - Biome type: Standard oasis that is arid and humid. Fed by an underground source.


  • Date Palm (phoenix dactylifera): Only found surrounding the Vitae Oasis within the Mors Desert. The Date Palm is a large palm with highly textured tan-brown bark, no additional branches, a furl of stiff palm fronds at the top, and hanging clusters of edible date fruit. Due to the dry climate, the fruit is edible long after it has fallen from the tree - making it an important food source. This palm can grow to be 75 feet tall.



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Elatus Canyon - Biome type: Xeric shrubland, also known as a sagebrush steppe or, more commonly, desert grasslands.


  • Beavertail Cactus (opuntia basilaris): A small cactus with numerous relatively small pads/nopales, which has bright pink flowers atop them and are covered in glochids (small barbed bristles) instead of spines.

    Chenille Prickly Pear (opuntia aciculata): A medium-sized, clustered cactus covered in multitudes of clustered spines and glochids (small barbed bristles), with red-orange flowers at the tip of each stem. Aside from the spines, the fruit and soft pads/nopales are edible.

    Fan Palm (washingtonia filifera): A palm tree with gray-tan highly textured bark, no branches diverging from the main trunk, large fronds (which can grow to be 13 feet long), and a skirt of dead fronds underneath living ones. This tree can grow to be 60 feet tall.

    Mohave Yucca (yucca schidigera): A small tree with gray-brown bark, a dense crown of spiraling bayonet-like leaves (with brown dead leaves underneath), white bell-shaped flowers atop the stem, and cylindrical edible berries. This tree grows to be 16 feet tall.

    Nightdew Agave (Agave candentis): A large succulent within the Agave family, the base of this plant resembles the spiny bushel of the Agave Ovatifolia. It has barbed, acuminate shaped leaves - oval at the base, tapering to a long, thin point that is as sharp as it is long. Out of the center of this is the exceptionally tall inflorescence. All along the inflorescence's stalk, are small little pockets within the stem itself. When the Nightdew begins to produce flower buds, they are nestled into these little pockets - dormant throughout the day, and blooming only at night. The peach-colored flowers themselves are as magnificent as they are useful, and unique in the sense that they feature two different types of petals on the same flower. The inner circle of the flower resembles the tiger daylily, with linear curved petals and prominent stamens and carpels. Cradling the base of the inner circle is a ring of pink petals that look strikingly similar to a carnation's petals. What is most amazing about these flowers is not only their looks, but their beneficial properties - they act as a stimulant when eaten, and can provide extra stamina boosts to those who are ailing, ill, or plan on traversing across the Mors Desert. Additionally, the flowers seem to produce a decent bit of nectar that has a mild bioluminescent property. 

    Utah Juniper (juniperus osteosperma): A relatively small shrub-like tree with iconic twisting trunks, gnarled bark, and olive green, scale-like leaves. It can grow to be 20 feet tall.

    Velvet Mesquite (prosopis velutina): A medium sized, deciduous perennial legume tree with widely diverging branches, brown bark with a shredded texture, yellow branch thorns, bipinnately compound leaves that fold up at dark, yellow catkin flowers and edible seedpods. This tree can grow to be 30 feet tall.

    Whitethorn Acacia (vachellia constricta): A shrub-like tree with thin mahogany-gray stems/trunk, even-pinnate leaves, seed pods, and yellow ball-like flowers. This tree can grow to be 6.5 feet tall.



  • Desert Lavender (hyptis emoryi): A perennial shrub with multiple stems, hairy white-gray-green oval leaves, and petite lavender flowers. It is incredibly fragrant, and a favorite of honeybees. This plant can grow to be 18 feet tall.

    Indigo Bush (psorothamnus fremontii): A perennial shrub with thin branches exhibiting spiny tips, vivid purple flowers, hairy gray-green leaves, and legume seedpods. This plant can grow to be 5 feet tall.

    Ocotillo (fouquieria splendens): A tall plant with spiny stems, small vibrant ovate leaves, and bright crimson flowers clustered at the tip of mature stems. Ocotillo appears to be a cacti, but it is not. This plant can grow to be 33 feet tall.



  • Sacred Datura (datura wrightii): A medium sized, low to the ground perennial flowering plant with dark green tapered leaves, globular seed pods that are small and spiny, and sweetly fragrant white trumpet-style flowers. The leaves, seed pods, flower, and roots - all parts of this plant - are considered extremely toxic, and can be fatal if ingested. It can cause seizures, visual and auditory hallucinations (which can last for days), severe disorientation, and trouble breathing, speaking, or seeing.



  • African Wild Dog (lycaon pictus): A medium to large sized hypercarnivorous canine, unmistakable due to its signature brown, tan, and white splotched coat with outsized ears. They can grow to be 30 inches tall at the shoulders and weigh up to 65 pounds. Initially, these dogs don't seem like a particular threat - but when you evaluate how they work as a large pack, running prey to exhaustion, you might be tempted to change your opinion on them. Despite their not so imposing size, they do pose a significant risk to the inhabitants of Novus. Their packs consist of 10 individuals on average, but can be as large as 30. They are beyond fearless, and will take on prey much larger than they are.

    Desert Bighorn Sheep (ovis canadensis nelsoni): A stocky, heavy-bodied sheep with signature curving horns on both sexes. They are adept at climbing up steep, rocky terrain and cliff sides. They are similar in size to a mule deer, and can weigh as much as 280 pounds. They pose no massive threat to the inhabitants of Novus, but will charge if threatened, protecting young, or rutting. They regularly feast on the local cacti and form herds of 10 plus individuals. 

    Dorcas Gazelle (gazella dorcas): A small gazelle with longer than normal ears, strongly curved horns, and pale fawn-colored fur. They form large herds and can grow to be 1 foot tall at the shoulder, and weigh up to 45 pounds. 

    Elder Teryr (Quetzalcoatlus aquila): A massive beast second only to the Sandwyrm, Solterra truly does seem to have it out for its inhabitants. The Elder Teryr can grow to be 15 feet tall and weigh 300 pounds. A relative of the Quetzalcoatlus, this long-necked predator can traverse both the ground or skies. Their wing pollex has a well-developed, talon-bearing foot which takes the place of front legs for when they take to land. Their body's feathers closely match that of a Philippine Eagle, with white-and-brown barred and a distinctive underbelly of white-golden feathers. All along their expansive necks, they have a crest of white-and-brown barred feathers that has the ability to be raised or lowered, depending on mood and communication needs. The beaks of this massive predator are long, blue in hue, and feature a grand casque closest to the eyes. The edges of this impressive casque is jagged, and will flush with vibrant blues and reds during mating season. This dinosaur-bird predator is highly carnivorous, and isn't afraid to try and pick off large prey from the land.

    Northern Ground Hornbill (bucorvus abyssinicus): A large, mostly terrestrial hornbill with black body feathers, white primary feathers, long black bill with a similarly-colored casque on top of it, blue headskin, and a red inflatable patch of skin on their throats. They can grow to be 43 inches long, 39 inches tall, and weigh up to 9 pounds. They feed on insects, reptiles, small vertebrates, seeds, fruit, and carrion. They walk mostly everywhere, and only take to the skies when startled or in danger. 

    Rüppell's Fox (vulpes rueppellii): A small, large-eared fox species that is reddish along the spine and around their eyes, with the color fading down their sides into gray and then eventually to a sandy color on their underbody. They can grow to be 30 inches long and weigh on average 4 pounds. Their fur is not particularly long, but their tail is plush and almost as long as the rest of their body. 



  • Gila Monster (heloderma suspectum): A venomous (albeit sluggish) species of lizard, easily identified by its distinctive reticulated black and orange-/red-tan pattern and bead-like scales. They can grow to be 2 feet long and weigh up to 2 pounds. Its body is thick and stout, with a heavy head and tail. They can be mostly found in burrows, or under rocks and other shelter, but will often venture out to immerse themselves in puddles after rain. They are carnivorous, but not adept hunters - they will eat small birds, mammals, lizards, eggs, and insects, in addition to carrion. The mildly neurotoxic venom is produced in their lower jaw's salivary glands. They have no fangs to inject said venom, but rather "chew" it into the victim's wounds. Most bites are not fatal to healthy adults. However, victims will experience excruciating pain and edema at the bite, and general weakness.

    Great Basin Rattlesnake (crotalus oreganus): A venomous rattlesnake with a distinctive color: on their topside, dark brown with intermittent tan bands; on their underside, heavy tan and brown banding. They can grow to be 40 to 65 inches long and weigh up to 1.5 pounds. Their venom is neurotoxic, causing rapid muscle necrosis, paralysis, and severe blood clotting/coagulation.



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#4


Terrastella




Susurro Fields - Biome type: Wet meadow. In standard seasons, the soil is moist but not soaked through - in the rainy season, it floods.


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  • Giant Bur Reed (sparganium eurycarpum): A semiaquatic grass-like plant with round bur-like flowers. This plant can grow to be 6 feet tall.

    Tussock Sedge (carex stricta): A tall grass-like sedge plant with clusters of seeds near the top of the stalks. This plant can grow to be 2 feet tall.

    Wraithgrass (Urtica allucinatio): A tall grass-like sedge plant, Wraithgrass is easily distinguishable by its tightly clustered bunches, deep purple color, and extremely fuzzy clusters of seeds near the tops of the stalks. This sedge can grow to be 5 feet tall. It's highly suggested that all inhabitants steer clear of this seemingly innocuous grass, as it packs a nasty punch. The long stalks of this plant are lined with hollow, stinging hairs called trichomes. These needle-like hairs deliver a powerful hallucinogen, which leaves the afflicted feeling severely nauseous and experiencing intense audio and visual hallucinations not long after coming into contact. These effects can last for days, and are often accompanied by severe muscle cramping at the sting site. 



  • Cardinal Flower (lobelia cardinalis): A tall perennial herbaceous plant that has whorled lanceolate leaves and vibrantly red flowers at the top of the stem. The leaves can be potentially toxic to foals, elderly, infirm, or those pregnant. It can cause nausea and vomiting, but is generally not toxic to healthy adults. This flowering plant can grow to be 4 feet tall.

    Michaelmas Daisy (symphyotrichum novae-angeliae): A perennial herbaceous plant with green lance-shaped leaves, hairy stems, and ray-floret flowers that range from white, to rose, to deep purple. This flowering plant can grow to be 47 inches tall.

    Nodding Lady’s Tresses (spiranthes cernua): A small species of orchid with linear grass-like leaves and fragrant white downward-curving flowers that grow along the upper part of the erect stem. This orchid can grow to be 12 inches tall.



  • Eurasian Curlew (numenius arquata): A small to medium sized bird with distinctive brown and white barred feathers, long legs, and a long curved beak. This bird can grow to be 12 inches tall, 24 inches long, weigh up to 3 pounds, and have a wingspan of 42 inches.  

    Great Egret (ardea alba): A large wading bird with all white feathers, sharp tapered yellow bills, long black legs, and long arched necks. This bird can grow to be 3.5 feet tall, 40 inches long, weigh up to 2 pounds, and have a wingspan of 67 inches.

    Malachite Kingfisher (corythornis cristatus): A small but vibrant semiaquatic bird with a bright red beak, rusted orange underbelly feathers, and a metallic blue crown and back. Easily recognizable by their distinctive fishing method of perching, and then dive-bombing the water. This bird can grow to be 5 inches tall and 5 inches long.

    Mirestag (Odocoileus turpis): A seemingly mutated relative of the common deer, these territorial creatures can be found wandering between the meadows and swamp. They are smaller than a standard deer in weight, but have longer and lankier legs by far. Overall, they can grow to be 4 feet tall at the shoulders, and weigh up to 85 pounds. Their antlers are exceptionally long and have a heavy curve to them, sloping down with the arch of their neck and over the stretch of their backs. Packed with many more tines than any standard deer, all of the tips of said prongs are downward facing to prevent catching on swamp plants. Their body is littered with callous protrusions that seem to serve no actual purpose, and seem to be particularly thick along their legs. They have been known to charge at any animal they deem are 'invading their territory,' but this behavior is highly erratic. Sometimes, they won't pay invaders any mind. Other times, they may rush inhabitants, and then 30 seconds later seemingly 'forget' their prior aggression and begin to graze serenely. And in extreme cases, they will be unrelenting and continually assail their victims, following them for prolonged distances and time. It has been suggested that their appearance and general attitude is due to a fungal, parasitic infection... but who wants to get close enough to find out?

    Muskrat (ondatra zibethicus): Present during the wet season. A medium semiaquatic rodent with thick brown to black fur and long scaled tails. This rodent can grow to be 28 inches long and weigh up to 4.5 pounds.

    Red Fox (vulpes vulpes): Present during the dry season. They are a medium sized predatory mammal with distinctive vivid red fur, grey underbody, black legs and ears, and a plush tail. They prey on vertebrates smaller than themselves and occasionally carrion. This mammal can be 20 inches tall at the shoulder, 35 inches long, and weigh up to 30 pounds.



  • Firefly (photinus pyralis): A small nocturnal insect characterized by its vibrantly bright, um, posterior. When disturbed (or trying to attract a mate), they light up with bioluminescence. This insect grows to be only 1 inch long or less.

    Grass Snake (natrix natrix): A species of nonvenomous semiaquatic snake with brown/olive-green scales, and a distinctive band behind the head with two stripes running down the spine. Diet is mostly amphibian based. This snake can grow to be 24 inches long.

    Spotted Turtle (clemmys guttate): A small semiaquatic turtle with a smooth dark-colored upper shell with tiny yellow spots and long tails. This turtle can grow to be 4.5 inches long.



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Tinea Swamp - Biome type: Deep freshwater forested swamp.


  • Baldcypress (taxodium distichum): A deciduous conifer tree with a heavily tapered trunk, stringy gray- to red-brown bark, sprouts near the main trunk referred to as 'cypress knees,' even pinnate leaves with green globular cones. This tree can grow to be 120 feet tall with a trunk 6 feet around. They can live thousands of years.

    Water Tupelo (nyssa aquatica): A deciduous tree with swollen bases that heavily taper, very sweet edible fruit, and knotted and highly textured bark. This tree can grow to be 80 feet tall and 50 plus years old. 



  • Maidencane (panicum hemitomon): An aquatic grass that thrives in saturated soils. This grass can grow to be 6.5 feet tall.

    Narrow-Leaved Cattail (typha angustifolia): A herbaceous plant with tall, grass-like leaves and signature sausage-shaped flowering heads. This plant can grow to be 6 feet tall.

    Skunk Cabbage (symplocarpus foetidus): A foul smelling flowering plant that has a characteristic mottled purple flower-bulb and large cabbage like leaves. They have contractile roots that pull stems deeper into the ground when they age, making them a very small plant - often wider than they are tall. This plant can grow to be 30 inches across with their leaves, and only 6 inches tall.



  • Wisp Lily (_____): _____



  • Capybara (hydrochaeris hydrochaeris): A medium sized herbivorous rodent with a barrel-shaped body, broad head and blunt muzzles, small round ears, webbed feet, and reddish-brown fur. This rodent can grow to be 2 feet tall at the shoulders, 4.5 feet long, and weigh up to 140 pounds.

    Goliath Heron (ardea goliath): A very large wading bird with a long neck, tapered sharp beak, gray body feathers, chestnut head and neck feathers, and white throat and breast feathers. It is a solitary forager, exhibiting a mostly pescivorous diet - however, they have been known to pick off small vertebrates and sometimes carrion. This bird can grow to be 60 inches tall and up to 11 pounds, with a wingspan of 90 inches.

    River Otter (lontra canadensis): A semiaquatic burrowing mammal with a long streamlined body, thick tail, webbed feet, and tiny ears almost flush to their head. They are opportunistic feeders, and will prey upon whatever is most readily available - whether it be small vertebrates, fish, or crustaceans. This mammal can grow to be 42 inches long and weigh up to 25 pounds.

    Shoebill (balaeniceps rex): A large stork-like wading bird with a massive shoe-shaped bill, grey feathers, and long legs. They are known for being "statue-like" and able to hold positions for long periods of time. They are mostly piscivorous, but will prey on small vertebrates if given the opportunity, as they have very sharp beaks and can easily decapitate most prey. This bird can grow to be 60 inches tall, 55 inches long, weigh up to 12 pounds, and have a wingspan of 8.5 feet.



  • Alligator Snapping Turtle (macrochelys temminckii): A large species of turtle with a distinctive dorsal-ridged shell scales, large head with a sharp curved beak, and a long spring-like neck. They are highly aggressive, and can break bones easily the larger they get. Their diet consists of anything that they can catch and eat. This turtle can grow to be 30 plus inches long and weigh up to 200 pounds.

    Bog Titan (_____): _____

    Water Moccasin (agkistrodon piscivorus): An aggressive and venomous semiaquatic pit viper that is mostly black on their dorsal side, dark brown crossbands, an off-white ventral side pocked with irregular dark markings, and a worm-like tail tip. This snake can grow to be 70 inches long. Their venom is cytotoxic, which will destroys tissue, cause severe pain, edema (swelling), and ecchymosis (bleeding under the skin) at the bite site. While the bite itself will not usually be fatal, the infection that onsets from tissue necrosis can end up becoming septic and therefore fatal.



  • Alligator Gar (atractosteus spatula): The largest of the gar species, these fish have long torpedo-shaped bodies, broad snouts, and a large double set of sharp teeth. They are relatively sluggish, and despite their intimidating appearance, will not actively prey upon Novus inhabitants. Instead, they prefer to hunt fish and small to medium sized vertebrates. They will only bite those wading through the Tinea Swamps if they are threatened or stepped on. This fish can grow to be 8 feet long, weigh in at 300 pounds, and be 45 inches around.

    Electric Catfish (malapterurus electricus): A small to large sized catfish that can deliver a shock of up to 350 volts from a large one, and lesser for smaller ones. Their shock is most often not fatal. In fact, depending on the size of the equine in relation to the catfish, it could be as gentle as a mild tingle, or as painful as a shock that forces muscle contraction.This fish can grow to be up to 4 feet long and weigh up to 45 pounds.

    Additionally, various species of freshwater and brackish water fish ranging in size from 4 to 10+ inches.







Praistigia Cliffs - Biome type: Where the Susurro Fields drops off abruptly to the Terminus sea. This section of meadow does not flood.


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Played by Offline all staff [PM] Posts: 4 — Threads: 2
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#5


Denocte




Sideralis Prairie - Biome type: Tall-grass prairie.


  • Iron Oak (quercus): A white oak tree with highly textured brown-gray bark, distinctive lobed leaves, and acorns. It's marked by its notable resistance to drought, fire, rot and its ability to live in poor soil. This tree can grow to be 50 feet tall.



  • Big Bluestem (andropogon gerardi): An exceptionally tall bunchgrass with blue-purple base stems and seed heads with spike-like projections. This bunchgrass can grow to be 10 feet tall.

    Leadplant (amorpha canescens): A tall flowering shrub with whorled odd-pinnate leaves and vibrant purple flowers atop racemes. This shrub can grow to be 3 feet tall.

    Switchgrass (panicum virgatum): An tall bunchgrass with deep roots and seeds developed on spikelets. This grass can grow to be 9 feet tall.



  • Prairie Blazing Star (liatris pycnostachya): A perennial herbaceous flowering plant with linear leaves and stunning rose pink flowers on racemes. This flower can grow to be 3 feet tall.

    Prairie Rosinweed (silphium integrifolium): A perennial herbaceous flowering plant with thick stalks, miniature sunflowers, and whorled leaves. This flower can grow to be 6.5 feet tall.



  • Burrowing Owl (athene cunicularia): A small owl species that has evolved to sprint as well as fly, with small beaks, large yellow eyes, and brown and white barred feathers. Despite their name, they do not create the burrows they inhabit – but rather use abandoned Prairie Dog dens.

    Leopard Ground Squirrel (ictidomys tridecemlineatus): A distant relative of the prairie dog and squirrel, this small rodent is distinctly recognizable by medium length squirrel-like tail, thirteen alternating brown and white longitudinal lines on its back and sides, with white spots in between said lines. They are not as social as prairie dogs and do not form large colonies, but they are not solitary mammals. They dig long burrow systems that they use to hibernate in during the winter. This rodent can grow to be 11 inches long and weigh up to 9 ounces. 

    Pronghorn (antilocapra americana): A medium sized antelope with distinctive horns on the males, and reddish-fawn to white coloring. The horns protrude upwards form their temples, form a distinctive inwards hook, and have a small prong on the front - where they get their name. They are incredibly fast, run at speeds of up to 55MPH for 1/2 mile (or 35MPH for 4 miles!), and live in small to medium sized herds. This antelope can grow to be 5 feet long, 41 inches high at the shoulder, and weigh up to 140 pounds.

    Sickle Wolf (_____): _____

    Striped Skunk (mephitis mephitis): A stoutly build, short limbed mammal with a heavily furred tail, distinctive back stripes, and highly developed scent glands used for defense. They are not a serious threat to inhabitants, but will spray if startled. Their spray can temporarily impair vision and cause a burning sensation in noses, ears, mouths, and eyes. This mammal can grow to be 30 inches long and weigh up to 12 pounds. 

    Upland Sandpiper (bartramia longicauda): A medium-sized bird with a dove-like head, long neck and legs, yellow and black bill,and heavily marbled brown and white feathers. This bird can grow to be 12 inches long, weigh up to 6 oz , and have a 26 inch wingspan. 

    Western Meadow Lark (sturnella neglecta): A medium-sized vibrant bird with brown and white marbled back feathers and a distinctive bright yellow underbody with a black throat. This bird can grow to be 8.5 inches in length and weigh up to 10 oz. 



  • Bullsnake (pituophis catenifer sayi): A nonvenomous snake with yellow to reddish-brown coloring, large blotching pattern on their spine with three sets of spots on side, and black bands on their tail. This snake can grow to be 6 feet long and weigh up to 6 pounds. 



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Vitreus Lake - Biome type: Deep freshwater lake in the middle of the Sideralis Prairie.


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  • Broadleaf Cattail (typha latifolia): A herbaceous plant with tall, grass-like leaves and signature sausage-shaped flowering heads. This plant can grow to be 10 feet tall.

    Water-Shield (brasenia schreberi): An aquatic plant floating peltate leaves (known as lily pads) and a single small purple flower. This plant can grow to be 12 inches in diameter. 



  • Cape Pondweed (aponogeton distachyum): An aquatic flowering plant with narrow oval leaves and aromatic white flowers. This plant can grow to be 6 inches tall above the water.

    Floatingheart (nymphoides aquatica): An aquatic flowering plant with floating peltate leaves (known as lily pads) and small white flowers. This plant can grow to be 6 inches in diameter. 

    Lizard's Tail (saururus cernuus): An aquatic flowering plant with heart-shaped leaves and aromatic white flower racemes that droop at the tips. This plant can grow to 4 feet tall.



  • Avocet (recurvirostra americana): A large ground-nesting, wading bird with long legs, cinnamon headfeathers, white underbody, black and white wings, and a black bill that is pointed and long. This bird can grow to be 20 inches long, weigh up to 15 ounces, and have a wingspan of 30 inches.

    Double-Crested Cormorant (phalacrocorax auritus): An iconic semi-aquatic bird with black body feathers, orange skin around their hooked bills, a stocky body with long neck, webbed feet, and fan-like tail. They are a species of bird that is best known for diving into the water to spear fish. Their feathers do not have an oily layer that keeps them dry - which would make it hard for them to dive and swim underwater - so after each time, they must dry out their feathers. They will often be spotted sitting on banks or logs with their wings spread out. This bird can grow to be 35 inches long, weigh up to 5.5 pounds, and have a wingspan of 48 inches.

    River Otter (lontra canadensis): A semiaquatic burrowing mammal with a long streamlined body, thick tail, webbed feet, and tiny ears almost flush to their head. They are opportunistic feeders, and will prey upon whatever is most readily available - whether it be small vertebrates, fish, or crustaceans. This mammal can grow to be 42 inches long and weigh up to 25 pounds.



  • Axolotl (ambystoma mexicanum): A medium sized solely aquatic salamander with distinctive filament-lined gill stalks, small underdeveloped legs, wide head, and a thick-base tapering tail. Unlike most salamanders, Axolotls do not have the ability to walk on land as they did not develop lungs during their metamorphosis. The come in a wide variety of colors; the most common is brown/tan with an olive undertone. Gold speckling across their skin is standard with almost every color. They also come in leucistic (pale pink with black eyes), albino (golden with golden eyes), axanthic (grey with black eyes), and melanoid (all black with no speckling or olive undertone). They can grow to be 18 inches long.

    Mistsnare (_____): _____

    Spectacled Caiman (caiman crocodilus): A small to medium sized crocodilian reptile with a gray-green coloration and darker splotches, which gives them their spectacled name. Only the largest of these reptiles will be a risk to inhabitants, as smaller caimans will avoid them altogether. This reptile can grow to be 6.5 feet long and weigh up to 90 pounds.



  • Largescale Archerfish (toxotes kimberleyensis): A medium sized fish with distinctive silver-gold body, black blotches on both sides, and a large angled mouth. They are best known for their unique hunting style: with powerful streams of water, they can knock insects off and into the water from up to 60 inches away. They have exceptionally well-developed visual recognition, which makes them hard to catch as well. Wading inhabitants may find that these playful fish will spit streams of water at them, too. This fish can grow to be 20 inches long and weigh up to 25 ounces.

    Piraíba (brachyplatystoma filamentosum): The largest catfish in the world, this massive fish is a bottom feeder with a dark silver-gray back and noted white belly below their lateral line. They are piscovorious and only feed on fish, but waders beware. With their immensely powerful jaws, they may bite those who step on them by accident. This fish can grow to be 12 feet long and weigh up to 400 pounds.

    Southern Saratoga (scleropages leichardti): A large fish in the arowana group with a long body, large pectoral fins, large scales (each with a red spot), and small paired barbels on their lower jaw. They feast mainly on other fish and insects large and small. This fish can grow to be 35 inches long.

    Various types of cichlids, carp, and trout.

    Various types of freshwater crabs and crayfish.







Arma Mountains - Biome type: Coniferous boreal forest (midline) and alpine mountains (topline).


  • Balsam Fir (abies balsamea): A coniferous evergreen tree with fissured bark and pointed crown. This tree can grow to be 65 feet tall.

    Black Spruce (picea mariana): A coniferous evergreen tree with a straight trunk, pointed crown, and scaly bark. This tree can grow to be 50 feet tall.

    Grand Willow (_____): _____

    Himalayan Hemlock (tsuga dumosa): A coniferous evergreen tree with thick bark and spirally arranged leaves This tree can grow to be 80 feet high.

    Lodgepole Pine (pinus contorta): A coniferous evergreen tree with thick bark and widely branching trunks. This tree can grow to be 160 feet tall.



  • Iceland Moss (cetraria islandica): A small moss-like lichen with chestnut colored leaves. This lichen can grow to be a few inches tall at most.



  • Alpine Forget-Me-Not (eritrichum nanum): A small flowering cushion plant with hairy oval leaves and bright blue flowers. This plant can grow to be 5 inches tall.

    Common Wood Sorrel (oxalis acetosella): A small flowering plant with clover-like leaves and bright white flowers.

    Poison Hemlock (conium maculatum): A herbaceous flowering plant with a tall green stem, two pinnate leaves, and small white flowers clustered in umbels. The entire plant is extremely toxic, and ingesting even small doses can lead to respiratory collapse and death, caused specifically by muscular paralysis. A fatal dose can be as small as 10 fresh leaves. This plant can grow to be 8 feet tall.



  • Alpine Ibex (capra ibex): A large species of wild goat with a distinctive small chin-beard and uniformly brown-gray fur. The males sport large, slightly curved horns and females sport smaller, straighter ones. They form small herds of a few individuals, and are very adept at traversing the rocky terrain of the mountains. They are not aggressive, but males will charge if threatened or rutting. This goat can grow to be 40 inches tall at the shoulder, 67 inches long, and weigh up to 260 pounds.

    Boreal Owl (aegolius funereus): A small nocturnal owl with distinctive brown and white barred feathers, and a large head. They feed on small vertebrates. This owl can grow to be 10 inches long and have a wingspan of 24 inches.

    Clouded Leopard (neofelis nebulosi): Found only in the taiga forest midline of Arma Mountains. A medium sized predatory feline with fur thinner than the higher-altitude Snow Leopard, long tails, and distinctive spots. They are not large enough to prey upon the adult inhabitants of Novus, but may try to pick off small foals. This feline can grow to be 20 inches tall at the shoulder, 45 inches long, and weigh up to 50 pounds.

    Snow Gryphon (_____): _____

    Snow Leopard (panthera uncia): Found only in the alpine topline of Arma Mountains. A large predatory feline with distinctively large paws on shorter legs, long tails, and thick spotted fur. They are a predatory animal, and do pose a risk to the inhabitants of Novus - especially those that are physically smaller. This feline can grow to be 24 inches tall at the shoulder, 60 inches long (100 with tail), and weigh up to 165 pounds.

    Takin (budorcas taxicolor): A large and stocky goat-antelope with short legs, deep chests, large head with a blunt muzzle, long shaggy coat with a darker dorsal stripe, and small horns. This goat-antelope can grow to be 55 inches at the shoulder, 87 inches long, and weigh up to 770 pounds.

    Various types of perching songbirds.

    White-Tailed Ptarmigan (lagopus leucura): A small grouse with gray, white, and black feathers in the summer (and completely white in the winter). It nests on the ground in small rocky areas. This bird can grow to be 12 inches long, and can weigh up to 1 pound.



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